‘Tomb Raider’ 2013 Release Date Broken Early; Find Out Where To Get It Before It’s Too Late

Posted: March 5, 2013 by Areeb Fazli in Games
Tags: , , , ,

Hail Britannia: “Tomb Raider” 2013 fans in the UK may be able to pick up a copy of Square Enix’s “Tomb Raider” 2013 reboot a day early, according to Eurogamer. The game was reportedly being sold in Tesco supermarkets in the United Kingdom today, March 4, a day before the official “Tomb Raider” 2013 release date of March 5 for PC, Xbox 360 and PS3. Videogamer notes that Tesco was asking the “highly competitive” price of £32 pounds for the Crystal Dynamics “Tomb Raider” 2013 title.

Hail Britannia: “Tomb Raider” 2013 fans in the UK may be able to pick up a copy of Square Enix’s “Tomb Raider” 2013 reboot a day early, according to Eurogamer. The game was reportedly being sold in Tesco supermarkets in the United Kingdom today, March 4, a day before the official “Tomb Raider” 2013 release date of March 5 for PC, Xbox 360 and PS3. Videogamer notes that Tesco was asking the “highly competitive” price of £32 pounds for the Crystal Dynamics “Tomb Raider” 2013 title.

Previously, we held published a round-up for “Tomb Raider” 2013, a release date for which has officially been slated for tomorrow, March 5, on Xbox 360, PC and PS3. Read some of the reviewers comments below:

Technogin (9)If “Tomb Raider'”s gameplay emphasizes freedom, the storytelling works through restraint. It’s not nearly as focused on realism as it pretends at first, but later supernatural elements form a creepy tonal undercurrent rather than an overwhelming narrative wave. Cutscenes are few and rarely run longer than a minute. “Tomb Raider” builds slowly through discovered diary entries, buried relics and environmental observations. It’s subtle and thoughtful in a way I didn’t expect.

Telegraph (5/5): The entire island is a coherent, wonderful playground filled with secrets, collectibles and areas you can access on return visits. Throughout the game, Lara picks up a variety of upgrades that enable her to perform additional actions, and these allow you to return to previous areas and access secrets, as well as accessing previously blocked off parts of the current level you’re in. Weapon parts and salvage can also be collected, in order to upgrade weapons, as well as earning XP to buy new combat/evasion abilities for Lara. It’s a neat upgrade system, particularly as you begin to unlock weapon add-ons, and add more moves to the combat repertoire.

Eurogamer (8): Yes, game series must be allowed to move on. Otherwise there would be no “Mario 64”, no “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time”, no “Jambo Safari Wii.” The problem with “Tomb Raider” is not that it’s trying to do something new. The problem is it’s trying to do what everyone else is doing […] It succeeds in that aim. The boxes can be ticked, several times over – collectables, upgrade systems, big fat guns, blood and gore, pretty graphics, set pieces, boss battles, cut-scenes where the characters’ lip movements almost match what they are saying, multiplayer modes, art galleries, quick-time events, more collectibles. All of these tricks are pulled off with competence and polish.

Digital Spy (5/5): While it’s a little too early to gauge the success of the “Tomb Raider” multiplayer experience, the single-player campaign alone is well worth the price of admission. With a well written cast of characters, mightily impressive production techniques, sumptuous visuals, tight platforming and surprisingly enjoyable combat, “Tomb Raider” is most definitely a release to be treasured.

Kotaku  (Yes): The truth here is that this game is a finely crafted reboot, one that ensures that Lara Croft herself won’t become a relic of the past. It’s gloomier, yes, and laden with a thick sheen of meta-awareness. This new origin story throws more trouble at its heroine than ever before. But the changes folded into this “Tomb Raider” add a turbulent urgency that the old adventures lacked. We’re left with a Lara Croft that we know better. She can handle what’s coming, especially when it looks like she can’t.

iDigital Times’ own Henry Crouch recently critiqued Square Enix’s marketing for the upcoming “Tomb Raider” reboot, noting that their most recent trailer reads like a Public Service Announcement, likely in effort to rectify prior accusations of misogynistic marketing. Crouch notes that while the “we are all Lara Croft” approach is certainly less male-oriented than some of the earlier marketing for the game, it loses sight of what makes the “Tomb Raider” protagonist a compelling character:

Croft is subjected to the difficult but all-too-common expectation for lady heroes to be both sexually appealing and self-sufficient, raising key questions about whether characters can sustain agency while also providing pleasure to an audience. To take away Lara’s complex identity by labeling her a Jane Doe is to disempower her unique potential as an inspirational character. It is ultimately up to Crystal Dynamics to define who Lara Croft is in 2013, whether she is an idealized figure to be ogled at, toyed with and subjected to cruelty, or whether she is a strong female role model to seek empowerment through. Square Enix’s new “Tomb Railer” trailer doesn’t bring us any closer to reconciliation between these seemingly disparate notions of who Lara Croft “is.” Instead, it avoids one altogether by distracting us with a flashy show of ventriloquism, “throwing” Lara’s voice, as with a dummy, in too many directions. 

This is not to say that video games or their marketing can’t have “a message.” It is, in fact, increasingly popular for games to take sociopolitical issues head-on. Game developers should be applauded for addressing the rampant gender inequality in our gaming culture, just not by way of a video game trailer aimed at targeting untapped demographics. How can a game, which upon its initial unveiling turned feminist critics’ heads for its dehumanizing portrayal of a young woman, go from objectifying its protagonist to practically disembodying her? It can’t. The primary problem with Square Enix’s new trailer is that it casts too wide a net: in attempting to address everyone, it has addressed no one.

View the aforementioned trailer below, and stay tuned for up-to-date news on all things “Tomb Raider:”

Source: IdigitalTimes

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